🎃 Halloween Challenge: Share your scary design project

This Halloween, we want to hear all about your experience designing a challenging or scary project! :ghost:

Share with us a project you’ve worked on with the following bullet points:

  • What’s the project (short description)
  • Why is it scary or challenging? (it can be scary to you because the material is unfamiliar, or challenging to the team because the design is unique, etc.)
  • How did you solve it

If you can, share a photo or two so we can all learn from each other!

Everyone who shared a project will be in the running to win a ClearCalcs t-shirt! :tshirt:

1 Like

There were two W14 columns on the first floor of a 5-story office building in Santa Clara, CA. They interfered with the sight-lines of a new auditorium. The CEO asked how much to remove them… and so we did.
Essentially, there are two braces spanning 50 feet on the second floor. They consist of ~W24 top and bottom with TS12 struts.

![IMG_2922|666x500](upload://sTCMlq3T8Hvce1kd[quote=“ati.aziz, post:1, topic:127, full:true”]
This Halloween, we want to hear all about your experience designing a challenging or scary project! :ghost:

Share with us a project you’ve worked on with the following bullet points:

  • What’s the project (short description)
  • Why is it scary or challenging? (it can be scary to you because the material is unfamiliar, or challenging to the team because the design is unique, etc.)
  • How did you solve it

If you can, share a photo or two so we can all learn from each other!

Everyone who shared a project will be in the running to win a ClearCalcs t-shirt! :tshirt:
[/quote]

1 Like

@Paul : welcome to Blueprint! You’re starting off with a BANG!

That’s a huge truss. Was it all fabricated in place? How did you bring it into the building otherwise?

Good question. Four hydraulic jacks were raised 7/8" to replace the two 14" WF on the first floor. They then assembled the two trusses in place (similar to a railroad bridge. The issue was the budget. Initially it was ~$270k. After the SE firm finished the drawings, it went to $650k. Why? Even though we took it to the level of the structural steel contractor for bidding, the SE then had to go back and include all sorts of angle iron drag struts throughout the second floor deck. I would have chromed those trusses if it wasn’t for the required fireproofing. Also, people involved had known the Landlord (huge name in the Bay Area) for decades and we had a great working relationship. Even then, we signed the standard “got to make it right if we want the original back” clause.

2 Likes

Sounds like you enjoy high stakes Jenga @Paul

Thanks for sharing your project here @Paul - we’d love to feature this in our next What’s New email.

As you’re the lucky one to win our ClearCalcs t-shirt, expect an email coming from me soon to get it sorted for you! :partying_face: